UX Fail – Buying a Rug from West Elm

Even though I’m a digital designer and I know poor UX or inaccessibility is not the user’s fault, I still end up feeling like I’m the one who is stupid when I can’t figure out how to work a site. How unfair is that! With more major retailers losing court cases in battles over website accessibility, I’m wondering how much longer it will be until I can feel a real presence of user-focused designers on the web.

Preventing users from feeling stupid is my #1 reason for wanting to be a digital designer/marketer. Whether that’s in the form of being a UX designer, a front-end developer, digital marketing expert – those roles all have the capacity to change the web! It makes me particularly angry when I’m trying to do something simple and give a company my money, and I can’t figure it out.

Searching for a rug online has been an interesting study in usability among major brands. I wanted something specific: an 8×10 wool area rug under $300.

Why do I want a wool rug, you ask? Because my cat, Alan, is a jerk and he refuses to barf anywhere except on rugs. Wool is magical and nothing soaks into it. It never gets stained. It’s sturdy and resilient. One time Alan got pissed at me for leaving him alone for a long weekend so he pooped on a rug. I need resilience from my home products.

Lucky black cat

With West Elm, I immediately became irritated because I couldn’t figure out how to sort their clearance rugs. With loads of options, I figured there had to be a filter option somewhere. There is no option!! You have to scroll through an endless list of rugs with a clearance “tag” and a price range. To see if they even have an 8×10 in that style, you have to click the “quick look” link. Then you have to select the size. THEN you get to see the actual price, which ends up being out of budget. THEN if you want to find out if it’s wool, you have to click the product description, which takes you to the full product page. And screw you if you happen to forget to click to  “open in new tab” because then you’ll have to navigate back to the giant list.

Poor UX searching for sale rugs on the West Elm website

West Elm’s regular non-sale rug section is marginally better, offering a handful of filters (none of which are material). I can select a style and a size, but I don’t know if it’s wool until I click through a bunch of links. They decided for me that style is more important than material. “Luxe Shine,” what does that even mean on a rug??

When I searched Wayfair, the experience was totally different. Not only was I able to select every feature I wanted before I looked at any rugs, but I could select simply by size straight from the navigation if I so chose!

Good UX by Wayfair with rug filters on their site

I understand small companies not having the resources to invest in user testing or in-house digital design talent. But a pricey, higher-end store like West Elm certainly has the resources to conduct user testing on their website. Perhaps they have, and the rug section was overlooked. It almost feels insulting as a user when you’re trying to give your hard-earned money to a company, and they haven’t put much effort into helping you out.

There should be a “website feedback” section of every site. I would use it all the time as a customer (for negative and positive feedback – I actually went in person to visit a brewery simply because I was enthralled with its web design and branding). As a designer, that would also be helpful. Sometimes things are missed or things change. I’ve worked for a large company and I understand this. But I also understand the need to educate everyone on the fact that the web IS continually changing, and as a result, so should your site.

 

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